Am I more excited about our new VP than I am about our new POTUS? YES!!!!!

I am writing this on Saturday November 7th, 2020 and we have learned that Joe Biden has reached over 270 electoral votes and is officially our new president-elect!!!!

For me, it’s been a morning of periodic whoops and yells and claps and jumping up and down to celebrate and release the stress I’ve been feeling all week, waiting for the election to be called.

While I am RELIEVED to not have to think about what another four years of Trump (bleh!!!) would look like, I am more ESCTATIC to think about what it means to have Kamala Harris be our next Vice President.

We’ll have our first BLACK VP.

We’ll have our first SOUTH ASIAN VP.

We’ll have our first WOMAN VP.

All in one!!!!!

It’s hard to think of Kamala Harris as one thing because she contains multitudes. I am consistently wrapping my head around it and I don’t care if I never make it all around.

It’s not a secret that women are always scrutinized in a way that men aren’t, especially in politics. One of them being associating motherhood to a woman’s worth.

We praise women for being mothers and show it as a sign of wholesomeness and that having your own children is part of being a “real” woman.

That’s what was consistently told to us by Republicans during the Amy Coney Barrett hearings. She’s a mother and that’s what makes her a good woman and what makes her a good judge because she will think about her role as a mother when she’s making decisions.

While Harris has adopted her husband’s children as her own, she technically does not have any of her own biological children.

And she’s okay with that! She’s still fulfilled by her life and what she’s done! And she has plans to do more!

She was also not continuously framed by her motherhood, or lack of motherhood. Unlike Amy Coney Barrett or even Sarah Palin, the last woman to be on a ticket as a VP. Additionally, Hillary Clinton was criticized for how she conducted her roll as a mother by conservatives.

And let me be clear here. Women who chose to be mothers are also amazing and do incredible work. There’s a lot of… just everything that goes into it that I can’t even imagine and I respect anyone who wants to take on that challenging role.

What I’m saying is that society is consistent in telling women that you cannot be a “real” woman or there’s something wrong with you if you don’t want to be a mother in some capacity. (All the Single Ladies by Rebecca Traister has multitude of examples. Highly recommend the read.)

Men are never framed by their fatherhood. No one says, “Hey, he’s a dad, maybe that will show that’s he’s sympathizes with families and other dads will like him and relate to him.” And if they are eternal bachelors, no one bats an eye.

I am incredibly grateful to have Kamala Harris as someone to look up to and show that motherhood does not have to be a major part of your identity in order to be legitimate in our society.

Women contain multitudes and it’s time we appreciate them for it!

And in terms of Harris’ new role as MADAM VICE PRESIDENT (!!) I am thinking… I am hoping that she will surprise us with what she does.

2 thoughts on “Am I more excited about our new VP than I am about our new POTUS? YES!!!!!

  1. I agree with you and I think she will! I hope the next for years show America what women can accomplish when given high leadership opportunities within our government. Within our community, we can continue the work of educating people about systematic racism and gender inequality and all the rest of our struggles. I hope we listen to each other’s perspective to try to understand what they believe and why. That would go a long way towards peaceful coexistence.

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  2. Biden was always my candidate because he has the experience and character to be an actual President. But I’ve followed Kamala since she was DA in San Francisco, and I’ve admired her balance of toughness and compassion. I’m overjoyed my party was the first to nominate and elect a female VP. And yes, I’ve known lost of women who didn’t see the need to add the title “mother” to their resumes. My cousin Jacqueline was breaking barriers way back in the 1940’s; two master’s degrees, a career as a teacher and school psychologist, and world traveller. She never felt it necessary to get married, no less have kids, to feel “fulfilled”. And if we’re going to use ACB as a role model, no thanks. Religious zealotry wrapped up as “motherhood and deceny”has never held any attraction to me. Nazi Germany gave medals to women who had more than three kids; did that make them “good mothers”?

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